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Read about the lubeoil known as castor oil

There are many different types of lubeoil - or, as it could otherwise be called, lubricating oil - that you could effectively export to other countries with assistance from the UK-based liquid cargo transport services provider Wake Marine. You could effectively export, for example, palm oil, rapeseed oil and sunflower seed oil; however, for this particular blog post, we are going to focus on the subject of castor oil. This lubeoil, a vegetable oil that can be obtained through pressing of seeds of the Castor plant, could be effectively exported to many countries because it is in high demand. Why exactly? There are several crucial reasons, as we will explain.

 

A simple introduction to castor oil

What actually is castor oil - other than, as we have already made clear, a lubeoil and a vegetable oil? It can be further described as a liquid that is colourless to very pale yellow and distinct in taste and odour once it is initially ingested. The name "castor oil", which was coined before the Castor plant got the similar name, probably derives from the use of castor oil in replacement of castoreum, a perfume base produced from glands of the beaver; 'castor' is the Latin word for 'beaver'. Castor oil is regularly put to many different purposes, such as to make soaps, hydraulic fluids, paints, inks and perfumes; however, for the rest of this blog post, we at that highly regarded of shipping companies, Wake Marine, are going to specifically discuss castor oil as a lubricant.

 

Castor oil is useful as a lubeoil for many scenarios

In many countries, vegetable oil lubricants are often, because of their good lubricity and biodegradability, favoured over petroleum-derived lubricants. Vegetable oils are actually limited in their widespread use as lubricants due to their oxidative stability and performance at low temperature. However, compared to most vegetable oils, castor oil has good low temperature viscosity qualities and high temperature lubrication, which means that it is often used to lubricate jet, diesel and race car engines that are regularly rebuilt. Castor oil is also often used to lubricate bicycle pumps and has had historical significance as a lubricant for Allied aircraft during World War I. Yes, that's right - castor oil has helped us to win a world war!